Space opera – Star Warz http://star-warz.net/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:41:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://star-warz.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-23T234539.702-150x150.png Space opera – Star Warz http://star-warz.net/ 32 32 Where to Find Local Handmade Goods in the Mid-Willamette Valley https://star-warz.net/where-to-find-local-handmade-goods-in-the-mid-willamette-valley/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:03:04 +0000 https://star-warz.net/where-to-find-local-handmade-goods-in-the-mid-willamette-valley/ There is an abundance of products made locally by talented and crafty people in the Mid-Willamette Valley. But sometimes finding those goods is the hardest part. Although farmers’ markets and websites such as Etsy are the main destination for some entrepreneurs, it can be a richer experience to see the items in person, perhaps even […]]]>

There is an abundance of products made locally by talented and crafty people in the Mid-Willamette Valley.

But sometimes finding those goods is the hardest part.

Although farmers’ markets and websites such as Etsy are the main destination for some entrepreneurs, it can be a richer experience to see the items in person, perhaps even meet the maker.

Here’s a roundup of some stores with vendors selling products ranging from personal care and cosmetics to home decor, clothing and more:

Halicuna Bay Mall

Driving along Commercial Street SE, you’ve probably passed Halicuna Bay Mall with its brightly colored signage. Although the name sounds like a tropical paradise, it’s actually a treasure trove of over 100 products from local vendors inside, including clothing, pickled foods, home decor, kitchenware, personal care products, jewelry and more.

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Why ‘Star-Wars’ is no longer science fiction https://star-warz.net/why-star-wars-is-no-longer-science-fiction/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 17:50:47 +0000 https://star-warz.net/why-star-wars-is-no-longer-science-fiction/ What began in the 1970s as an epic space opera has since grown into a pop culture phenomenon that spans a host of different genres. From sci-fi soap operas to dramatic war dramas, star wars has grown beyond the film medium in recent years. Credit: Disney In 1977, George Lucas planted a seed of excellence […]]]>

What began in the 1970s as an epic space opera has since grown into a pop culture phenomenon that spans a host of different genres. From sci-fi soap operas to dramatic war dramas, star wars has grown beyond the film medium in recent years.

Credit: Disney

In 1977, George Lucas planted a seed of excellence in science fiction that has since grown into one of the oldest franchises still in circulation. With nine mainline movies, a slew of spinoffs, TV shows, video games, and a whole legion of novels and comics, it’s safe to say that star wars always going strong. That being said, the series has expanded beyond the realms of science fiction. In fact, it wouldn’t be wrong to say that the series has flourished in other genres and motifs such as western, war drama, and even romance.

Related: New ‘Star Wars’ series explores the evil side of the Rebellion

This phenomenon is exceptionally visible in the Disney+ series from The Mandalorian and run to the recent release Andor. Although there will always be an element of science fiction in everything star wars the fact, watching the galaxy from far, far away spill out into other scenarios shows just how versatile the universe can be. In a realm where Western-style bounty hunters can wield blasters instead of six-shots, and space wizards can communicate with mystical energy that holds the universe together, there’s an ocean of stories that are waiting to be told.

Cad Flail
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While most viewers are used to the drama of Jedi and Sith, Rebels and Empire, Resistance and First Order, the Expanded Universe introduced whole new worlds of storytelling beyond the rims. The Mandalorian could have used a familiar frame, but it had a lot more in common with Classic Spaghetti Westerns that something like A new hope. His spiritual suite, The Boba Fett Book, mixed themes from old Hollywood gangster movies and samurai movie giants that inspired George Lucas’ original trilogy. By mixing these contrasting themes and patterns, the image of the star wars the universe becomes clearer and clearer.

Related: Ranking of the 6 episodes of Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi

The galaxy will still be home to Jedi and starships, but it will also be a place of gunslingers, spies, wizards, and even kaiju. By incorporating more than the standard patterns seen in a genre, star wars and the creators, writers, artists and actors behind it have continually breathed new life into an already awe-inspiring universe. The series continues to expand into new genres, mediums, styles, and stories with each new series, film, novel, and beyond. New stories are regularly presented to new audiences and the universe is virtually endless.

What is your favorite star wars gender? Tell us in the comments below!

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Renovations Reveal Bones and Secrets of Maine’s Oldest Opera House https://star-warz.net/renovations-reveal-bones-and-secrets-of-maines-oldest-opera-house/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 16:47:52 +0000 https://star-warz.net/renovations-reveal-bones-and-secrets-of-maines-oldest-opera-house/ GARDINER — If the oldest opera house in the state still has any secrets, they’ll be hard to find. More than six months into the multimillion-dollar project to redo the historic downtown Gardiner building and its 400-plus seat theater, the structure has been stripped of its bones. Layers of paint, fabric and wood added in […]]]>

GARDINER — If the oldest opera house in the state still has any secrets, they’ll be hard to find.

More than six months into the multimillion-dollar project to redo the historic downtown Gardiner building and its 400-plus seat theater, the structure has been stripped of its bones.

Layers of paint, fabric and wood added in previous renovations are peeled back to expose brick and wood, and new bones – in the form of steel beams and the structure to house the new elevator – are added to supporting the next phase of the life cycle of the former boarding stable at 280 Water Street.

The third floor theater stage during a tour last Wednesday from Johnson Hall at 280 Water St. in downtown Gardiner. Renovation plans include expanding the stage. Joe Phelan/Kennebec Journal

“I’ve given a million hits from here,” Johnson Hall executive and artistic director Michael Miclon said last week, standing on the ground floor of the building’s upper theater. “I would say when we are done there will be a balcony here and an elevator will go up there. And now I can really stand here and say, “Fuck, there’s a balcony over there and an elevator shaft right there.”

The mind-numbing part of working on a project that has taken nearly a decade to reach this point is all the work and planning required to be able to begin construction.

“I was like, ‘Are we going to (start) one day?’ For the rest of my life, (will I) say, “We’re going to start building? “That’s it,” he said, pointing to the new structures.

The plans resulting from years of work are built on thousands of details that will never be seen once the project is complete: The location of the plumbing and electrical conduit for the toilets and the sound system, the lights of the upper theater which cannot be changed from the rooftop, the orientation of the grand staircase, and the muffling of the elevator ding at the balcony level so as not to interfere with the live performance.

And some of these details only surfaced after the demolition began.

Until the building closed, the Studio Theater on the ground floor was used for shows and movies. Initially, Miclon said, very little was planned for the ground floor.

Now, in addition to the changes to the entrance, the Studio Theater is also getting a minor facelift. The ramp at the rear of the theater is removed as it does not meet the access requirements stipulated in the Americans with Disabilities Act. A ramp with a new entry point into the theater is planned.

Over the years the building has been used as an opera house, roller skating rink and a movie theater in the upper theatre.

As the layers of his identities were removed, Miclon said, other aspects of the building’s history were uncovered, including evidence of five fires and water damage. The practice at the time of the fires was to build on the damage, Miclon said, but now that damage, including some under the stage, needs to be repaired.

“It was a find of about $100,000,” he said, noting that the project’s provident fund was used to pay for it.

When fundraising for this project began more than six years ago, Miclon and his board anticipated a $4.3 million project to be completed in 2019.

Since then, a global COVID-19 pandemic with supply chain disruptions and ordinary and extraordinary inflation, as well as the revelation of the scope of work required to complete the project, have driven projected project costs up. to over $9 million, all of which have been bumped up, but there’s still a bit of a way to go.

Michael Miclon, executive and artistic director of Johnson Hall at 280 Water St., gestured toward the stage last Wednesday from the newly constructed balcony during a tour of the hall at 280 Water St. in downtown Gardiner. More than six months into a $9 million project to redo Maine’s oldest opera house, the building has been stripped of its bones. Joe Phelan/Kennebec Journal

When he first arrived at Johnson Hall in May 2013, Miclon said he was ready to begin construction immediately. Now, he said, the goal is to have a certificate of occupancy by December 31, 2023.

But that doesn’t mean the first show at the new theater will be scheduled for January 2024. Miclon said theater staff members will need time to learn the sound systems and understand how more than 400 people will move through the building before , during and after. shows.

At that time, Gardiner will be ready to welcome new visitors, Mayor Patricia Hart said, as it does now for annual events.

Gardiner Main Street’s Swine & Stein Brewfest draws up to 1,200 people to the annual Oktoberfest celebration, and Johnson Hall’s free waterfront concert series at Gardiner Park on the Kennebec River regularly draws more of 400 people.

The underside of a new balcony, seen from behind the third-floor theater, during a tour last Wednesday of Johnson Hall at 280 Water St. in downtown Gardiner. Joe Phelan/Kennebec Journal

“At the last concert of the season, we had the concert and the Art Walk and everyone found a place to park,” Hart said, noting that the city is leasing space on Water Street from Gardiner Main Street for additional parking.

In the meantime, Hart said city officials are working closely with Johnson Hall to ensure construction goes smoothly, and she anticipates that will continue when Johnson Hall reopens.

Although there is more than a year until the work is finished, Miclon said he was nostalgic to see photographs of the building as it was when he started working there and thought about what it would look like after the renovations.

“I’m glad it’s changed, but it was my home for nine years,” he said. “Now that’s funny because there are so many surprises when I say I didn’t know what it was going to be like. I didn’t know it was going to be like this. »


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English National Opera set to move – but not to Manchester https://star-warz.net/english-national-opera-set-to-move-but-not-to-manchester/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://star-warz.net/english-national-opera-set-to-move-but-not-to-manchester/ English National Opera started out of the last chance saloon. Arts Council of England patience has expired, and they told the company that something had to change drastically. ENO can’t say it wasn’t warned – over the past 20 years or more it has weathered a series of financial and managerial crises as it tried […]]]>

English National Opera started out of the last chance saloon. Arts Council of England patience has expired, and they told the company that something had to change drastically. ENO can’t say it wasn’t warned – over the past 20 years or more it has weathered a series of financial and managerial crises as it tried to maintain a flawed occupation-based business model from the white elephant which is totally impractical London Coliseum. Meanwhile, as bailouts have been handed out, grants have been cut and budgets have been slashed, audiences have dwindled. Despite some artistic successes, it couldn’t last any longer.

But what next? No one wants to see soloists, choir, orchestra and staff lose their jobs. There is still a core audience loyal to opera “at popular prices” and a need for outreach work. ACE are offering £17m to create a new structure, and there has been vague talk of moving the base to Manchester.

Such a relocation would be utter madness, and the fact that it was even mentioned suggests that no one has begun to think seriously about the issue. Opera North already presents regular seasons in Manchester (the Lowry in Salford, to be precise) and despite excellent production and marketing, it struggles to fill the house. The city’s new arts center at The Factory, not yet open, is totally unsuitable for opera, and the old Palace Theater is hampered by all the shortcomings of the Coliseum (notably the lack of rehearsal space, office and storage). Manchester, in short, neither want nor need ENO.

A much more practical possibility is a return to Sadler’s Wells in Islington, where the company was based until 1968. The theater (rebuilt since 1968) has good acoustics, an orchestra pit, a smaller space for opera chambers and rehearsal studios. Opera has been presented there successfully in the past, but it is now identified as a dance mecca.

That can continue to be that, while giving way to regular short seasons by a reduced ENO who can spend the rest of the time visiting university and cathedral cities such as Oxford, Cambridge, York and Bath, where there are a strong appetite for opera and who are not served by Opera North or Welsh National Opera. It is possible, but ENO must first grasp the reality and moderate its ambitions.

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Black Swan Was Physically Exhausting For Mila Kunis To Shoot, But Jupiter’s Rise Was Even Worse https://star-warz.net/black-swan-was-physically-exhausting-for-mila-kunis-to-shoot-but-jupiters-rise-was-even-worse/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 22:25:00 +0000 https://star-warz.net/black-swan-was-physically-exhausting-for-mila-kunis-to-shoot-but-jupiters-rise-was-even-worse/ Christian Bale and Heath Ledger are known as some of the actors set to go to extreme lengths to play a certain role. Ledger isolated himself for weeks in preparation for his interpretation of the Joker in Christopher Nolan The black Knight. Bale is known for gain and lose incredible amounts of weight for various […]]]>

Christian Bale and Heath Ledger are known as some of the actors set to go to extreme lengths to play a certain role. Ledger isolated himself for weeks in preparation for his interpretation of the Joker in Christopher Nolan The black Knight.


Bale is known for gain and lose incredible amounts of weight for various roles, including The fighter, Vice and Ford versus Ferrari, among others. These two industry titans might be some of the best-known names as method actors, but they’re not the only ones to go to such extreme lengths for a movie role.

VIDEO THINGS OF THE DAY

In 2010, Requiem for a dream director Darren Aronofsky worked on the psychological horror film Black Swan. For his two main roles, the filmmaker has enlisted the services of Natalie Portman and Mila Kunis, in the respective roles of White Swan and Black Swan.

RELATED: Sacha Baron Cohen and Other Similar Extreme Method Actors

The roles required both actors to push themselves to the limit, as Portman lost up to 20 pounds. Kunis also lost a similar amount of weight, although she had to get into a bad habit in order to achieve this.


Mila Kunis quickly gained weight after Black Swan

Having lost 20 pounds for Black Swan, Mila Kunis wasted no time regaining the weight after finishing filming. Even before production wrapped, the evening after performing her final dance scene in the film, she would later reveal that she ran home to dig into “a huge bowl of macaroni and cheese.”

After principal photography ended, she moved on, feeding off fast food from various joints across the country. “The first thing I did was pick up Panda Express from the airport terminal, Virgin America at JFK, and I was so excited,” she told Collider in an interview since November 2010.

“And then I landed in Los Angeles, got in my car, went to In-N-Out and had an animal-style double-double with a root beer float, and that’s it. was fantastic. That’s what I did. It was so good,” Kunis continued.

RELATED: How Natalie Portman Got ‘As Small As Possible’ In Black Swan Opposite Of Thor: Love And Thunder

Despite the heavy stress of preparing for the film, the actress said working with Darren Aronofsky was “truly one of the most incredible experiences of my life”.

Mila Kunis thought preparing for Jupiter’s ascension was worse than Black Swan

About five years after the release of Black SwanMila Kunis starred in Jupiter’s Ascendancya space opera film written and directed by the Wachowski brothers of The matrix celebrity. As in the picture by Darren Aronofsky, the actress played one of the two main roles in the film.

On the Apple TV site today, the synopsis for Jupiter’s Ascendancy bed: “Jupiter Jones was born under signs that predicted future greatness, but her reality as a woman is to clean other people’s houses and take endless breaks.”

“Caine, a genetically engineered hunter, arrives on Earth to locate her, finally making Jupiter aware of the great fate that awaits her: Jupiter’s genetic signature marks her as next in line for an extraordinary legacy that could alter the balance of the cosmos,” the plot summary concludes.

RELATED: Here’s How Mila Kunis and Natalie Portman Really Felt About That “Black Swan” Scene

The character of Kunis in Jupiter’s Ascendancy was the titular Jupiter Jones. It’s a role she says she found even harder to prepare for than she did in Black Swan.

How did Mila Kunis prepare for her role in Jupiter Ascending?

In May 2009, Mila Kunis hosted an “Ask Me Anything” Q&A session on Reddit. In the interaction, a fan asked how it was to prepare for her role in Black Swan. The actress took the opportunity to reveal that while Aronofsky’s film was difficult, it was nothing compared to Jupiter’s Ascendancy.

Black Swan was the most physically demanding part I’ve ever done, until Jupiter’s Ascendancy… For Jupiteryou [would] do as much wiring training as possible every day,” Kunis wrote. It was in a later interview with Hello Magazine that she would reveal the extent of this grueling preparation.

“Physically, it was the toughest role I’ve ever had. You train for six months and you train all day, five days a week,” she said. never been so fit in my life and by the time we started shooting I had no body fat left I thought nothing would be harder than the prep I did for Black Swanwhere I lost 20 pounds, but it was longer and more rigorous.

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Can the symphony return to the Peón Contreras “before spring”? https://star-warz.net/can-the-symphony-return-to-the-peon-contreras-before-spring/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 10:34:59 +0000 https://star-warz.net/can-the-symphony-return-to-the-peon-contreras-before-spring/ Rubble and fires damage Mérida’s magnificent Teatro Peón Contreras. Photo: courtesy Mérida Mayor Renán Barrera Concha said authorities were aiming for the Teatro José Peon Contreras to reopen “before spring”. The famous opera house – the most important performance space in Yucatán – was badly damaged in a fire last week. In a radio interview, […]]]>
Rubble and fires damage Mérida’s magnificent Teatro Peón Contreras. Photo: courtesy

Mérida Mayor Renán Barrera Concha said authorities were aiming for the Teatro José Peon Contreras to reopen “before spring”.

The famous opera house – the most important performance space in Yucatán – was badly damaged in a fire last week.

In a radio interview, the mayor shared more details about the cause of the fire. The fire started when an audio console on the top floor was shorted out, he said.

He said a surveillance drone with night vision and heat sensors helped areas identify the specific point from where the incident occurred.

The fire destroyed large parts of the 114-year-old building, including its fresco painted inside the dome above the auditorium. The dressing rooms on the third level were also destroyed, as were the light fixtures in the lobby.

After the fire, the Peón Contreras chandelier remained intact. Photo: merida.gob

Its magnificent luster was saved by a mechanical system that allowed workers to quickly lower it out of harm’s way, he said.

The Yucatán Symphony Orchestra has suspended ticket sales but there are still five performances left for its current season.

Renán Barrera said Governor Mauricio Vila Dosal has expressed interest in reopening the venue as soon as possible, so he hopes the Yucatán Symphony Orchestra will be able to perform on its stage again “before spring 2023”.

The symphony orchestra did not reveal if the fall 2022 season will be suspended or if it will announce another venue.

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Theater review | NCRT’s ‘Gaslight’ sheds light on psychological manipulation – Times-Standard https://star-warz.net/theater-review-ncrts-gaslight-sheds-light-on-psychological-manipulation-times-standard/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 10:38:27 +0000 https://star-warz.net/theater-review-ncrts-gaslight-sheds-light-on-psychological-manipulation-times-standard/ First, let me say that I can see why the North Coast Repertory Theater (which chose to stage Patrick Hamilton’s original 1935 screenplay of the famous 1940 Oscar-winning film version of “Gaslight” ) might have done so to “inform” current audiences of the origin of this now infamous (often “politically armed”) term. Explanation: This is […]]]>

First, let me say that I can see why the North Coast Repertory Theater (which chose to stage Patrick Hamilton’s original 1935 screenplay of the famous 1940 Oscar-winning film version of “Gaslight” ) might have done so to “inform” current audiences of the origin of this now infamous (often “politically armed”) term.

Explanation: This is the 1880s in Victorian London. Jack Manningham (Jonathan Moreno) is a misogynistic, dominating and dangerous man. One who relentlessly abuses (emotionally, sometimes physically) his bullied and submissive wife, Bella (Olive Dunn), to the point of driving her almost insane.

He does this verbally and psychologically, often using the lowering and raising of their home’s “gas lamps” to visually emphasize what she “imagines” is happening. Along with his devilishly engineered illusion, he also hides things he accuses her of losing. And cruelly, he constantly “reminds” him that his mother ended up in an insane asylum and soon “she will be too”.

Additionally, he brazenly flirts with their house’s naughty young maid, Nancy (Sara Jane), in front of his wife, insulting her further in the shameless process. We eventually find out that his blatant advances were apparently welcomed, if not brought to a more “romantic” conclusion with the smitten servant. At least not yet.

Bella is left alone all day, with the exception of the sassy Nancy, and another “happily loyal to Bella” maid, Elizabeth (Heather Hulbert), and Jack also leaves her alone every night for ” go out on the town” and does not come back. until much later. But, she still experiences the gaslights “behaving strangely” shortly after she leaves, then hears footsteps stomping on the floor in the “empty, unused attic space” above her head. (Of course, what a “surprise” it all ended once he got home.)

It appears their home was the site of the murder (about 10 years prior) of Bella’s aunt, a wealthy elderly woman whose very expensive jewelry (motive for a robbery gone wrong?) was never found. found. It also appears that she “kept company” with a younger, handsome man who was soon suspected of being her killer, but disappeared after her death.

Apparently her “unknown” killer had completely ransacked the house, looking for the missing gems, but apparently couldn’t find them. So now, had ‘he’ returned to the scene of his crime after seven years (the length of his marriage to the woman he was ‘driving mad’) to still frantically search for the jewelry he had killed for? To guess.

Wasn’t that, in fact, the fundamental reason why the ruthless Manningham had sought out the obviously naive Bella and convinced her to marry him when he discovered that she would be the one who would eventually move into his aunt’s house where the jewelry he was obsessed with still remained?

Yes. But only if he could “get rid of” Bella as he searched for his aunt’s elusive treasure (still waiting, hidden somewhere in the house) that he had never given up on making his own. After all, he had killed to have them.

Consequently, he would “turn on” the increasingly unsettled Bella with untrue facts so insistently and constantly that she would eventually have to accept them as true – and walk away after losing her mind, leaving the house behind. her for her possible discovery of jewelry. that would make him a rich man.

However, that heartless plan changes after a stranger – a retired detective named Inspector Rough (Noel August) – shows up unannounced one night after Jack’s usual departure. It changes everything that has been set in motion.

Although Bella is afraid of what she said, she is ultimately convinced of both her husband’s past killing act and his current actions to drive her insane. With her cooperation, the Inspector promises not only to protect her, but also to bring him to justice for his crime.

How it all happens in the middle of dialogue that is extremely “stilted” and would only be considered “conversational” in the context of highly stylized melodrama conversation.

Therefore, since this was not (to my knowledge) the playwright’s original intention, it lends an uncomfortable lack of authenticity to their “relationships”. It undermines the charming Dunn’s already understated approach to her character and underscores Moreno’s overly despicable and unnuanced approach.

It’s really hard to believe that any semblance of a “romantic connection” could have existed between them. She somehow always remains “the victim” and he “the aggressor” – even at the end after Bella “finds herself”.

And, it’s also impossible to swallow the fact that he’s an “irresistible townsman” who could not only still hold the bruised heart of an abused Bella, but steal the lustful heart of a “smitten” Nancy.

Sadly, there’s no “chemistry” between them to prove this point, although Jack (for some reason, never mentioned or explained) does occasionally ably play a number of (seductive?) classic songs on the grand piano in the living room.

No intriguing “Phantom of the Opera” vibe here if that’s what director Kelly Hughes was going for.

As for the performances of other cast members, Jane’s Nancy “always livens up the action” when she’s around; and Elizabeth de Hulbert is solid in the limited times she is on stage.

However, I wonder what actor August (or director Hughes) was thinking when deciding on the bizarre character presented as Inspector Rough. Looking like the recently escaped The Mad Hatter character from ‘Alice in Wonderland’ – complete with an over-the-top “top hat”, vocal delivery and impersonation to boot – it’s immediately obvious this is meant to be a no -gender- specific characterization, in look and approach.

And, the character lines that consistently begin with “Mrs. Manningham,” adds to the stylized impression (as do Jack’s lines that often start with the name of the person he’s talking to – bad choice of playwright, not actors).

But, none of the above explains exactly why the Inspector (who we already know is not the plot’s usual gruff, middle-aged male actor playing the part), suddenly decided to “tell a secret” to Bella.

This happens when the actor takes off his clothes (back to the audience) to show him the character’s “true self” – at least for a few minutes, before putting them back on. What? Why?

Once this odd behavior passes and the action continues, we never find out why it happened, or what bearing (if any) it has/had on the original plot. Mad Hatter indeed. (Squirrel! Look over there! Gaslight. Gotcha.)

Luckily, the distracting Inspector “Wonderland” disguise is the only one where costume designer Olivia Gambino misses the mark. Bella’s pale pink dress is perfect for portraying her “innocent” personality; Jack’s dark, intimidating long coat and Victorian “gentleman” attire reflect his “ambitions”; and the starched black-and-white uniforms of the housekeepers fitted Nancy a little tighter than that of the “stilted” Elizabeth.

However, back to the plot of the play. The ending manages to deliver some interesting and entertaining twists before the web of lies woven by the blatantly deceptive and murderous villain is unraveled by the finally brave woman who can escape his clutches for good.

While I question some of Hughes’ directing choices for the actors, technically she made some solid ones for her sound and stage designs. Skillfully constructed by Hughes (and the show’s excellent lighting/property designer, Brian Butler), the resulting Victorian living room is stunning. It is visually arresting, inhabiting the entire space with authentic period furnishings from floor to walls. With the plush lounge all on one level and a separate raised level (where tea is served) at the back of the stage. Using rich, deep colors to enhance the whole thing (with a pair of all-important gaslights attached to the audience’s left wall oddly setting the mood).

The board operators for lights and sound are Anna Gillespie and Alana Hollis; managers, Jane and Hughes. All do their best under the watchful eye of NCRT’s artistic director, Calder Johnson.

Either way (no matter how hard the cast and crew work), the fact remains that the content is hard to live with. The public can only be shaken. Because today, not just in Victorian times, there is still psychological/emotional manipulation and potential physical abuse suffered by a woman too scared to escape.

So if you’re looking for a piece that will “entertain you” in the traditional sense of “entertainment,” then NCRT’s “Gaslight” isn’t the series for you. But, if you’re ready to get going, then this classic old “thriller” continues its run at NCRT with performances at 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays: November 4, 5, 11, 12, 18, and November 19 and 2. matinees and afternoons on Sundays: 6, 13 and 20 Nov.

Tickets are $18 general and $10 for students/seniors. For advance reservations, call 707-442-6278 or go to ncrtboxoffice@gmail.com.

NCRT is located at 300 Fifth St. in Eureka. To enter, proof of COVID-19 vaccination or recent negative test (within 72 hours) is required. And, wearing a mask is recommended.

The duration of the play is approximately two hours with a 15 minute intermission.

But, please remember. Any members of the public who might be personally emotionally triggered by the disturbing content of this play regarding mental and/or physical domestic violence should not attend this production.

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When Buildings Attack: A Six-Part Series of Unfortunate Architectural Events | Features https://star-warz.net/when-buildings-attack-a-six-part-series-of-unfortunate-architectural-events-features/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 11:00:35 +0000 https://star-warz.net/when-buildings-attack-a-six-part-series-of-unfortunate-architectural-events-features/ Image: Niall Patrick Walsh/Midjourney In the worlds of horror and thriller, buildings sometimes seem to take on a life of their own. Of The brilliants Overlooking the hotel at That of the observer 657 Boulevard, the architecture and the space become more than a backdrop or a vehicle but rather become main characters in […]]]>

Image: Niall Patrick Walsh/Midjourney

In the worlds of horror and thriller, buildings sometimes seem to take on a life of their own. Of The brilliants Overlooking the hotel at That of the observer 657 Boulevard, the architecture and the space become more than a backdrop or a vehicle but rather become main characters in their own right; sometimes at the peril of their occupants.

Contrary to Hollywood, real-world buildings don’t always follow a script. Even works of architecture overseen by some of the world’s best-known architects can become unexpected antagonists for those who compose or surround them. Below, we’ve rounded up six such examples, from Heat Rays to Ice Daggers to Flying Ceramics.

Unlike the many serious real estate disasters analyzed in our editorial lately, these six stories fortunately did not lead to serious injuries or deaths. Humanity did not come out unscathed, however. In one case, a lawyer’s hair nearly caught fire, while in another, some insurance company investors suffered stomach aches. Tragic, indeed.

20 Fenchurch StreetLondon by Rafael Viñoly Architects

20 Fenchurch Street, London by Rafael Viñoly Architects. Picture © User: Colin/Wikimedia Commons

It’s fitting that we start our Halloween-themed roundup on Fenchurch Street, an area of ​​London that was once home to the infamous Jack the Ripper. It is also here that we find the 20 Fenchurch Street designed by Rafael Viñoly – colloquially known as walkie-talkie tower.

Reluctant winner of the 2015 Carbuncle Cup for the UK’s Worst Building, the Walkie-Talkie has occasionally channeled its inner Ripper into terrorizing the streets of East London, but thankfully not with comparable tragic results. In 2013, ultra-bright light reflecting off the concave glass facade of the building melted cars parked in the street below, would be six times brighter than direct sunlight. Passers-by complained of being blinded by the dazzling beam, as were shopkeepers who claimed the intense beam burned and scorched a doormat in their premises.

This was not the end of the Walkie-Talkie horror show. In 2015, the building returns to the headlines once again after locals complained of strong winds near the base of the tower, prompting a “rigorous” assessment of whether the tower had created a wind tunnel effect. “I almost got blown the other day walking past the building,” a person told the BBC. “When I got around the corner, everything was fine. I was afraid to go back.”

Vdara Hotel & Spa, Las Vegas by Rafael Viñoly Architects

Vdara Hotel & Spa, Las Vegas by Rafael Viñoly Architects. Picture © picture

The Walkie-Talkie isn’t the only Viñoly building with a feisty attitude. The architect’s Vdara Hotel & Spa in Las Vegas came under intense scrutiny in 2010 when it was discovered that, like the walkie-talkie, the tower’s concave glass facade was concentrating sunlight intense on the surrounding areas.

The “death ray”, as the locals called him, raised temperatures in the hotel pool by around 20 degrees, with a guest saying the pool reached 107.6 degrees Fahrenheit and an attorney saying his head nearly caught fire. Fortunately, the hotel’s use of giant blue umbrellas over the pool means the architects are, for now, running out of hot water.

Walt Disney Concert HallLA by Gehry Partners

Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles by Gehry Partners. Picture © Antoine Taveneaux/Wikimedia Commons

Frank Gehry once called his Walt Disney Concert Hall a sailboat”. Although lauded for its trademark curves, the building’s history has not been entirely straightforward. As in Viñoly’s Tale of Two Towers, Disney Hall played the pantomime villain soon after it opened in 2003, when the sun’s rays bounced off the building’s highly reflective surface. blind drivers passing in front of the building. The overwhelming light was accompanied by intense heat, with nearby residential buildings reporting increased use of air conditioning as a result.

The problems were finally resolved when the faceplate was sanded down by workmen to dull the shiny metal. “The reflection was not my fault” gehry said of the incident. “I told them it would happen. I was taking the heat for the whole thing. It made the list of the ten worst technical disasters of the decade. I saw it on TV, on the History Channel. I was number ten. “It’s another day, another list, for the shining star of Disney.

Ray and Maria Stata Center, Boston by Gehry Partners

Ray and Maria Stata Center, Boston by Gehry Partners. Picture © Pablo Valerio/Wikimedia Commons

Across the country at his Disney Hall, Gehry’s Ray and Maria Stata Center in MIT suffered from the extreme adverse weather. In 2007, the institute filed a complaint against Gehry for a series of structural problems. Most terrifying, perhaps, was this CNBC refers to as “daggers of icicles hanging from the roof like deadly belt weights.” The trial also claimed that snow and ice would dangerously cascade from planters and other roof areas, blocking emergency exits and damaging the building itself.

MIT ultimately paid more than $1.5 million for repairs to address sliding ice and snow, as well as drainage issues that caused cracks in walls and mold to grow on the exterior brick cladding of the building.

John Hancock TowerBoston by IM Pei & Partners (now Freed Pei Cobb & Partners)

John Hancock Tower, Boston by IM Pei & Partners (now Pei Cobb Freed & Partners). Picture © Christian de Montfort/Wikimedia Commons

Since its completion in 1976, The John Hancock Tower remained the tallest building in New England. Conceived by Henry N. Cobb for IM Pei & Partners, the building has been a staple of the Boston skyline for nearly half a century.

The lofty heights, however, came at a cost to the employees of the John Hancock Life Insurance Company, who occupied the building when it opened. As reported by CBS, the building would twist and sway back and forth a few centimeters in normal wind conditions, causing motion sickness in occupants of upper floors. The problem was eventually solved by installing a tuned mass damper.

The episode was one of many for the tower throughout his life. During construction, the foundation’s retaining walls damaged sidewalks and nearby buildings, while the 10,334 panes of glass in the tower’s facade have been replaced after several detached and fallen from the building.

Palau de les Arts Opera Reina Sofía, Valencia, Spain by Santiago Calatrava

Palau de les Arts Opera Reina Sofía, Valencia, Spain by Santiago Calatrava. Picture © Alberto-g-rovi/Wikimedia Commons

Despite being the tallest opera house in the world, by Santiago Calatrava Palau de les Arts could never hope to match the height of the John Hancock Tower. It could, however, match his story of doom. A year after it opened in 2005, the opera house’s main stage collapsed as it held an entire production of Don Giovanni, forcing organizers to postpone the remainder of their inaugural opera season. One year later, heavy flooding again damaged the newly reconstructed main stage, while water in the building’s lower floors destroyed the building’s complex stage equipment.

For the building’s government owners, the final act of drama came in 2014 when parts of the opera house’s iconic ceramic roof blew off in high winds, forcing the building to close to the public for two months. The regional government continued Calatrava for the cost of repairs — one of the several trials endured by the Valencian architect.

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Colored dress “Allesandro Nell’Indie” for the Bayreuth Baroque Opera Festival https://star-warz.net/colored-dress-allesandro-nellindie-for-the-bayreuth-baroque-opera-festival/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 09:14:59 +0000 https://star-warz.net/colored-dress-allesandro-nellindie-for-the-bayreuth-baroque-opera-festival/ Colored dress “Allesandro Nell’Indie” for the Bayreuth Baroque Opera Festival October 28, 2022]]>

Colored dress “Allesandro Nell’Indie” for the Bayreuth Baroque Opera Festival

colorful dress

Germany – Bayreuth, epicenter of creativity and exploration of the world of opera, this year hosted its third Baroque Opera Festival (BBOF) with a lively program of works including “Allesandro Nell’Indie”, lit by French LD David Debrinay using over 50 Robe moving lights, including T1 and T2 profiles and LEDBeam 350.

Three memorable performances conducted by Max Emmanuel Cencic, also the Festival’s artistic director and one of the principals, were presented at the magnificent Margravial Opera House (Markgräfliches Opernhaus). Opened in 1748 and declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2012, the venue reopened in 2018 after extensive renovations. It is also a museum and is only licensed for 30 live performances per year.

David, from Lyon-based design firm LJOMA Studio, and Max have worked on several previous projects, including the other two Bayreuth Baroque Opera Festivals in 2020 and 2021. They share a great imaginative synergy that is essential in a scenario like this- here, where the lighting for a new opera production has to happen in a five or six day period, a super fast and very rushed time frame more often associated with rock & roll.

Several creative starting points for David’s lighting design included Max’s overall direction of the play, Dominico Franchi’s intricate set design with his rolling B stage, and Guiseppe Palella’s elaborate costumes, all of which brought an air of glamor , color, humor and fantasy in Bollywood. on stage as the libretto unfolded.

The five-hour performance revolved around the Indian campaign of Alexander the Great and his defeat of King Poros in 326 BCE at the Battle of Hydaspes.

Kai Fischer, who is locally based and works as a freelance and technical production specialist and director for a range of shows and events, coordinated the Festival’s lighting specifications and supply. He has worked on the Bayreuth Baroque Opera Festival since its inception for event production company TC Promotion which coordinates all production requirements for the festival, and has also worked on a few seasons of the Bayreuth Wagner Festival, so he knows well the city and the place.

As the Margravial Opera House can only present 30 live performances per year, there is no in-house lighting system and all production has to be outsourced. Kai researched the lighting plan, discussed it extensively with David, and then found the best kit to provide his optimal show lighting.

In 2021 there had been some color mixing issues with the chosen moving lights, so this year the priority was to rebrand and make sure everything would be perfect to unleash David’s visual flair to enrich the stock.

One of David’s stipulations was for the color-changing chase spots, which became a pilot as Kai researched flexible LED chase solutions, which first led him to the remote tracking system RoboSpot.

Only LED fixtures can be used in the auditorium of the Margravial Opera House – to reduce heat and preserve the valuable historic setting and environment as well as for durability – so he sought out bright and powerful LED units that would work as chase spots.

Michael Herrmann of Robe Germany recommended that he consider a RoboSpot system coupled with T2 profiles. They were certainly quite bright and had other aesthetic benefits like high CRI, making them ideal for tracking cueing in this type of environment.

As using a RoboSpot system removed the need for operators standing in the tiny FOH spotlight booth, it also eliminated any potential disruption with audible call and scene management signals on the intercom, this which is a source of intense irritation for the notoriously ruthless opera audience!

So having two T2 profiles running on both RoboSpot systems controlled from a behind-the-scenes booth was an ingenious solution. They could change colors, and additionally, when not used as follow lights, the fixtures could be used for other roles in the show.

The quiet operation of the T2 profile also met another challenge. Two other key FOH positions are just 30cm from the nearest viewers sitting literally next to the light fixtures on the edges of the third balcony. Due to the design of the building and its heritage status, no forward trusses can be erected.

Impressed with all the features of the T2 profile, David and Kai spec’d another 20 units on production which were distributed on the LX bars on stage 1, 3, 4 and 6, making a total of 24 T2 profiles.

These were complemented by 12 T1 profiles and 24 LEDBeam 350s.

Four T1s, one each on two towers on either side of the stage, were joined by six on LX2 with the last pair in the very tight stage slide positions on the floor.

In the acute-angled offstage auditorium slide positions, right and left, there was one LEDBeam 350 per side for very steep front washes, with the rest spread across LX 1, 3, 4 and 5 on stage where they worked as general stage wash and for specials.

TC Promotion had purchased eight of its own LEDBeam 350s over the summer, and these were bolstered by a further 16, supplied, along with all other Robe kits, by rental company Motion Group.

“Everyone was thrilled with the choice of lights,” enthused Kai, including the production manager of TV production company Ozango which aired Alessandro Nell’Indie’s performance for broadcaster Arte.

The FOH T2 profile chases running at just 20% were enough to capture the essence and style of the production and make it look great live and on camera.

The RoboSpot Festival operators were also impressed.

This was Stefan Schmidt’s first RoboSpot adventure, so he did some homework beforehand at the Volkstheater in Munich, which also has a system, and found it very easy to learn. Peter Schaarschuh has used it before on The Voice of Germany and was happy to do it again here, appreciating the adaptability and being able to keep up with fast performers.

Before the final lighting specifications were confirmed, Michael from Robe Germany and Kai carried out extensive testing on site to ensure that all fixtures would work as expected.

When considering lighting the show, David had two fundamental principles in mind. He knew the costumes would be colorful, shiny and somewhat glitzy, with lots of diamonds and crystals, so good quality front and white light was crucial to bring out all those details for the audience.

Colors were also an absolute key to energizing the vitality, look and style that everyone wanted for this production.

David needed tight, precise color control for authentic skin tones and good stage makeup handling.

As the floor and walls were dark red, he also needed to dynamically change these main surface colors, glowing with electric reds and blues, bouncy yellows and pungent greens for the duration of the performance, adding depth. to all the stage rooms. , so saturated colors were essential along with effective wash light to add soft hues and sharp detail.

Many requests for a light!

He noted that using a “conventional” chase, he would typically expect to get about four or five shades of the fixture. Using the T2 profiles in this role he could get about 15, 16 or more tints from the fixtures, and these could even move into a benchmark, so he was extremely pleased with that and how the refined light output worked on faces and disguises.

He describes the quality of the T2’s multi-spectral light engine as “astonishing”, especially when layering hue and CT whites delivered by additive color mixing, while maintaining the strength and brightness of saturated colors.

By spreading the emitted light evenly across the entire Planck curve, the T2 provides the widest possible color gamut, while simultaneously providing full and seamless CCT range control.

It was also his first time using the T1 profiles, although “certainly not the last”, and he was very pleased with the compact LEDBeam 350s and their saturated colors.

Working in this incredibly special space was a huge privilege and responsibility for everyone involved, and David and Kai started from scratch on the lighting to make ‘Alessandro Nell’Indie’ a truly magical performance. It was a great experience working with a team of talented and passionate people, all dedicated to making this new production of the work and bringing it to life in such a unique setting.

The lighting was programmed by Matthias Schäflein on an ION Xe console; the two have worked together since the first BBOF.

The 18 artists: six singers, two actors and ten dancers were choreographed by Sumon Rudra, and the work was presented in the traditional Italian Baroque style, with men playing all female roles.

The Orkiestra {oh!} from Poland provided exceptional musical accompaniment, led by principal violinist Martyna Pashuszka.

photos: Louise Stickland

www.robe.cz

colorful dress colorful dress

October 28, 2022

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Where have you seen the cast of Ticket To Paradise before https://star-warz.net/where-have-you-seen-the-cast-of-ticket-to-paradise-before/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 18:15:00 +0000 https://star-warz.net/where-have-you-seen-the-cast-of-ticket-to-paradise-before/ Playing Lily’s love interest Gede in “Ticket to Paradise”, French-born Indonesian actor Maxime Bouttier has remained in the Indonesian market for most of his acting career, making him likely few of his past works will be immediately recognized by casual moviegoers. . Still, with “Ticket to Paradise” being her first internationally released rom-com, that likely […]]]>

Playing Lily’s love interest Gede in “Ticket to Paradise”, French-born Indonesian actor Maxime Bouttier has remained in the Indonesian market for most of his acting career, making him likely few of his past works will be immediately recognized by casual moviegoers. . Still, with “Ticket to Paradise” being her first internationally released rom-com, that likely won’t hold true much longer.

Bouttier began his career in 2013 as Oliver in the romantic drama “Refrain,” before quickly switching things up and trying out the horror genre with “After School Horror” and “Kamar 207.” Other roles included lead role in “Dilarang Masuk!”, Vino in “Meet Me After Sunset”, and Matthew in “Matt and Mou”. On the television side, he is best known for portraying Abi and Rangga in the series “Rewrite” and “Unknown”, respectively.

Perhaps going back to his early horror roots, Bouttier even dabbled in directing with the 2019 horror film “Kain Kafan Hitam,” in which he also starred as Bimo. Given that his acting career is only now gaining global attention, we’ll be interested to see what the future holds for him.

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