Space opera – Star Warz http://star-warz.net/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 23:39:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://star-warz.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-23T234539.702-150x150.png Space opera – Star Warz http://star-warz.net/ 32 32 In “Sun & Sea”, econihilism goes to the beach https://star-warz.net/in-sun-sea-econihilism-goes-to-the-beach/ https://star-warz.net/in-sun-sea-econihilism-goes-to-the-beach/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 22:00:59 +0000 https://star-warz.net/in-sun-sea-econihilism-goes-to-the-beach/ Sun & Sea, at BAM. Photo: Richard Termine / BAM Watching someone else’s vacation has gone from hard to excruciating over the past couple of years. It is one of the sharp little knives that wields Sun & Sea, the long-running opera at BAM’s Fishman Space this weekend. For the five hour production (once in […]]]>

Sun & Sea, at BAM.
Photo: Richard Termine / BAM

Watching someone else’s vacation has gone from hard to excruciating over the past couple of years. It is one of the sharp little knives that wields Sun & Sea, the long-running opera at BAM’s Fishman Space this weekend. For the five hour production (once in you can stay or go as you please), the stage was transformed into a realistic beach with 25 tons of sand sprawled from wall to wall. To see it, the audience must go to the balcony level of the small theater and stand well above the stage on all four sides, like visitors to an operating room or technicians in flies. You have to cling jealously to a balustrade to see the beach below, and there is something about this posture – so different from the usual princely sitting position of the spectator – which makes us look like poor relatives, wallflowers who must spy on the pleasures of others.

Lithuanian director and decorator Rugilė Barzdžiukaitė filled the beach with bodies, all reading, snacking and passing the time, a row of lounge chairs forming one corner, a parasol thrown into another. Thirteen are singers; the others are extras ready to move and kick the sand. The behavior of the distribution, naturalistic and constantly evolving (although the libretto by Vaiva Grainytė itself Is repeat on a one hour loop), runs at a slow pace on vacation days. A couple discuss whether it’s time to go in the water. The children are chatting and playing. A dog is taken (dragged) for a walk. And while people are lounging on their pastel napkins, they sometimes sing too.

The songs are usually brief glimpses into the mind of a sleepy person: a man thinking about how he met his lover, or a workaholic worried about whether exhaustion is really a real concern. Grainytė’s lyrics have been translated into English, but it is still difficult to understand the vocals as they follow Lina Lapelyte’s non-melodic hopscotch compositions. Sometimes the language is crystal clear – a man remembers the volcano that interrupted his vacation plans, and we hear every word – other times we have to check the printed booklet to understand. Lapelyte’s sounds are invariably chime and calm, so it’s surprising that some thoughts are heated, even frightened. “Our swimsuits are filled with algae! the whole room sings in chorus, complaining that the ocean is turning green, blooming with eutrophication. As the sound overwhelms you, it’s easy to miss that the world around these sun worshipers is poisoned, willful, inhospitable: “Staying ashore is strongly advised!” You shouldn’t leave your children unattended! The dazed laziness of music infects them and infects us too, so we can’t always understand these warnings.

Initially, Sun & Sea was a commission for the Lithuanian pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2019. In Venice, a city literally submerged by cruise ships, the problem of the vacation industrial complex would surely have been acute. Time has only refined that perk: The Biennale performance came almost a year before the pandemic-era beach vacation became … what? Out of reach? Irresponsible? The alone responsible holidays? While they were building the production, Barzdžiukaitė and his team were clearly thinking about how ‘hobbies’ contain and erase evidence of the disasters happening all around us, and the crises that have arisen have only made their arguments stronger. relevant.

The title joke Sun & Sea it’s that we don’t really see one or the other. We see sand, we seem to feel the heat, but the sun and the ocean are themselves basically “off the stage” – these are the temptations, pressures and threats that people take for granted. The sea is full of ripples and eddies – “Acid waves, ivory foam” sings a woman, telling us about her ex-husband who drowned – and the libretto begins and ends with a woman singing on Sun cream. “Protection for hypersensitive skin,” she sings as she read the label, and our minds drift from melanoma screenings to Hawaii and Indonesia, places where certain types of sunscreen kill coral reefs. Jealousy turns to revulsion: all the teeming life on stage begins to switch, under your weary eyes, into the wriggling life on a microscope slide, crushed by our distant gaze. The exaggerated length of the evening is itself part of the show’s indictment – it gives us plenty of time to get fed up with humans and their trash.

The show is about questioning pleasure, and I think it’s intentional that it somehow ruins your night. Granted, your own physical discomfort is part of the show after about half an hour (depending on your lower back health); your ability to extract the story, drama, and intrigue from the micro-events will indicate how interested you are in the events below. The music is sober, only becomes luxuriant during collective choral moments when the whole room rings. And the more the lyrics remind you of everything that’s wrong with the world, the more the sight of such extravagant inactivity will bristle you. Maybe it’s not just an opera? Maybe it’s aversion therapy for our leisure-obsessed generation? You walk into the show with an enviable image of ease – and then walk away when you can’t take it anymore.

Sun & Sea is at BAM Fishman until September 26.


Source link

]]>
https://star-warz.net/in-sun-sea-econihilism-goes-to-the-beach/feed/ 0
Belmont Vision – Belmont dedicates $ 180 million to the Fisher Center for Performing Arts https://star-warz.net/belmont-vision-belmont-dedicates-180-million-to-the-fisher-center-for-performing-arts/ https://star-warz.net/belmont-vision-belmont-dedicates-180-million-to-the-fisher-center-for-performing-arts/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 20:18:48 +0000 https://star-warz.net/belmont-vision-belmont-dedicates-180-million-to-the-fisher-center-for-performing-arts/ Belmont on Tuesday opened the Fisher Center for the Performing Arts in a groundbreaking ceremony, an event that has lasted four years and nine days. The center, a premier venue built to world-class specifications, spans four floors, with approximately 150,000 square feet of space suitable for use by students and professionals. Named in honor of […]]]>

Belmont on Tuesday opened the Fisher Center for the Performing Arts in a groundbreaking ceremony, an event that has lasted four years and nine days.

The center, a premier venue built to world-class specifications, spans four floors, with approximately 150,000 square feet of space suitable for use by students and professionals.

Named in honor of former university president Bob Fisher, who held the post for over 20 years, the center commemorates his accomplishments during his tenure, which included more than $ 1 billion in projects from expansion of the campus.

“What I would really like to emphasize is that this is for our students,” said Fisher, the guest of honor at the event. “I hope that will be the message sent. We think you are so good.

The center contains a massive 1,700-seat opera house, two multi-purpose ballrooms, as well as a rehearsal space, dressing rooms and backstage technical facilities.

Hidden details of Fisher’s heritage are imprinted throughout the building, including the bees that line the classic stone columns on the facade and inside the Great Hall. Inside the high domed ceiling, twinkling LED stars represent the constellations visible on April 1, 2000, the day the fishermen arrived at Belmont.

The Fisher Center is the largest and most technologically advanced performance hall on campus, designed in the style of a European opera house. Belmont Vision / Ansley Letsinger

The concert hall will host locally and nationally recognized artists, with performances from the Nashville Ballet and the Nashville Opera already on the event schedule.

But Belmont students will also take ownership of the scene in the months to come.

“The opportunities we may have here are unlike anywhere else in the world. No other student will be able to perform in a space like this, ”said Avery Goodwin, a double major in songwriting and music.

Student productions, including theater, dance, and music, will all use the Fisher Center, starting with the Department of Drama and Dance’s production of “Peter and the Starcatcher,” which runs February 25-27, 2022 .

The university’s national television show “Christmas at Belmont” will also find its new home at the Fisher Center when it returns to theaters in September.

“I could see artists of all genres wanting to perform here,” said Belmont president Marty Dickens.

A bronze statue of Fisher and his wife, Judy, stands outside the building named in their honor.

And Fisher’s philosophy of hard work is etched on the statue as a reminder of the growth to come at Belmont:

“You haven’t seen anything yet.”

The statue of Bob and Judy Fisher, created by sculptor Jeffrey Hall, was also unveiled on Tuesday. Belmont Vision / Anna Jackson

PHOTO: The banner drops to reveal the name of the new performing arts center, which was kept a secret from students and faculty until Tuesday’s unveiling. Belmont Vision / Anna Jackson

This article was written by Ansley Letsinger and Walker Dixon.

—–

Would you like to receive important information about Belmont by email?
Enter your email address below to have important stories sent directly to you!

Thank you, we will contact you!


Source link

]]>
https://star-warz.net/belmont-vision-belmont-dedicates-180-million-to-the-fisher-center-for-performing-arts/feed/ 0
“Dune” and “The Matrix” show how science fiction has gone astray https://star-warz.net/dune-and-the-matrix-show-how-science-fiction-has-gone-astray/ https://star-warz.net/dune-and-the-matrix-show-how-science-fiction-has-gone-astray/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 10:04:39 +0000 https://star-warz.net/dune-and-the-matrix-show-how-science-fiction-has-gone-astray/ When politics or the economy don’t give much cause for celebration, Americans turn to the screen. The 1930s demanded effervescent shows that made us laugh during the Depression. The 1970s gave rise to a new genre of thriller that reflected the paranoia of the post-Vietnam era. The last few decades have seen an explosion of […]]]>

When politics or the economy don’t give much cause for celebration, Americans turn to the screen. The 1930s demanded effervescent shows that made us laugh during the Depression. The 1970s gave rise to a new genre of thriller that reflected the paranoia of the post-Vietnam era. The last few decades have seen an explosion of science fiction and fantasy. With the shrinking audience for adult dramas, superheroes, spaceships, and monsters reign supreme.

This change helps explain the buzz surrounding two releases this fall. Dune is the first installment in a third attempt at Frank Herbert’s classic novel, which has already been shot once as a feature film and once as a TV miniseries. Matrix resurrections is the fourth installment in a franchise that helped start the trend.

There’s one catch, though: both movies look terrible. It’s not entirely fair to judge by the previews, but the directors’ other work suggests that they will be technically accomplished, incredibly loud, deeply serious, and utterly boring.

The material is not the problem. Often ridiculed as children’s stuff, imaginative genres help us think through situations and aesthetics that would otherwise seem ridiculous. Like musicals, another genre that has seen a recent renaissance, science fiction is not bound by the laws of physics or logic. This is an area worth exploring, rather than dismissing it.

Instead, the problem lies in transforming sci-fi and its cousins ​​into the kind of seamless tailoring they were once pitted against. Once the genre where anything could happen, science fiction now tends towards high budget, high technique, and infinitely low risk. The result has all of the genre’s flaws, including flat characterization and absurd dialogue, with few rewards.

In the 1960s, critic Manny Farber describe tension through a contrast between “white elephant” and “termite” art. The “white elephant” represents consistency. Each image, sound and performance is meant to adapt, producing a work comparable to the masterpieces of 19th century European painting and literature. It is easy to find these qualities in the mid-range prestige dramas. But Farber also finds them in the fashionable authors of the time, like François Truffaut, whose seemingly unconventional style hid a mania for order.

The art of termites escapes this kind of control. Whether it’s because it’s produced cheaply, the actors cash in, or the challenges are beyond the director’s technical capabilities, “” The art of termites-tapeworms-mushroom-moss, “Farber explained,” is always going forward by eating its own limits and, like no, leaves nothing in its path other than signs of greedy, industrious and neglected activity. As the name suggests, termite art is always at risk of collapsing under its own weight.

Farber’s defense of chaotic, incompetence and quirk was part of the then-controversial appreciation of B-movies and genre films he shared with critics like Pauline Kael. But it also explains how economic and technological changes have sucked the lives of the kinds where termites once thrived.

Take the new one Dune. Directed by Denis Villeneuve, who has directed a series of acclaimed sci-fi and fantasy productions, it’s kind of a revamp of David Lynch’s 1984 version. While producers expected a rival Star wars, Lynch turned into an epic of strangeness that combined elements of Alejandro Jodorowsky’s failed production a decade earlier with Lynch’s own distinctive vision. Released in a redacted version that the director disowned, the film is both an economic and a critical disaster.

Longer cuts released later solve some of the exposure and structure issues. Even without these changes, however, Lynch Dune is an unintentional masterpiece of termite art. Much of the cast doesn’t seem to understand the meaning of their lines – or even what movie they’re in. It’s perfect, however, for a film that deals in part with the line between reality and dreams – a line blurred by the copious consumption of characters. hallucinogenic “spice”. Like other Lynch films, Dune works better as an experience than as a story.

Lynch also created an aesthetic that increases audience discomfort (in a good way). The sets, costumes, and makeup effects of the mutated characters were unusual in their ability to convince audiences that the action is set in a world that is not our own. This includes deviations from the source material, which angered some fans. In Lynch’s versions, the evil Harkonnen clan seems to subsist on a bloody purple juice that runs through the veins of their minions. It wasn’t in the source material, among other departures, that angered fans. Regardless, it’s deliciously weird.

At least in the trailers, the new Dune does not promise any of these qualities. Monumental, gritty and obsessively faithful to Herbert’s Byzantine plot, it is the coherent synthesis of form and matter that Lynch was unable to deliver. For this reason, however, it has little to offer anyone who isn’t already committed to the premise. The first reviews express disappointment in this “lifeless spice opera” on “a comical and massive scale”.

The matrix, on the other hand, has always been the art of the white elephant. The 1999 original was applauded for a premise borrowed from the dorm philosophy and a sleek look influenced by Hong Kong video games and action films. These very qualities, however, left her airless, as every scene and shot was stylized into something that approached abstraction.

by Lynch Dune can be compared to termites trying to make their way out of the towering but fragile structures that contain them. Watching The matrix it is like being dragged into a room of sensory deprivation. This is not incompatible with the Gnostic vanity that animates the plot, but creates an exhausting but paradoxically forgettable experience. Most memorable is Hugo Weaving’s termite performance as Agent Smith, one of the only hints of humor in the otherwise dismal business.

The directors are not entirely to blame for the burgeoning white elephant trends, which are exacerbated by the expectation of endless sequelae and fallout. In addition to huge budgets that make it harder to justify creative experiences, technological improvements offer a level of aesthetic control that eluded filmmakers of the past. According to Farber, the faults of the elephant’s handwriting are the attempts to “1) frame the action with an overall motif, 2) to place each event, character, situation in a frieze of continuities, and 3) to process every inch of the screen … as a potential area for award-winning creativity. ”In addition to the economic incentives to start a franchise, green screens, digital footage and post-production manipulation make these sins hard to resist.

But impressive shots, top-notch castings, and a cohesive artistic vision come at the expense of bewildering qualities that once gave science fiction improbable power. In Lipstick traces, a volume best described as a spiritual punk rock story, critic Greil Marcus harnesses the ephemera of pop culture to find clues to the mess and violence that lurk beneath the surface of modern life. Among other examples, he unearths Quatermass and the pit (released in the United States under the name Five million years on Earth), a 1967 British film that has something to do with the Martians who colonized Earth in the distant past. He describe watch in true horror as the plot culminates in sheer, uncontrollable anarchy that escapes both the narrative and technical limits of low-budget production.

Moments like this, where the film’s stuffing bursts out of its own constraints, revealing more than its creators ever intended, are rare in today’s technically accomplished, deeply serious, and utterly boring shows. Termites survive in duds, bombs and forgotten unique pieces like Dark city (1998), which combines elements that foreshadow The matrix with themes of Five million years on Earth. The big exception is the unexpected superb Mad Max: Fury Road (2015), who managed to preserve the gonzo energy of its predecessor from the white elephant temptations of modern budget and technology. Hope the next prequel don’t spoil that too.


Source link

]]>
https://star-warz.net/dune-and-the-matrix-show-how-science-fiction-has-gone-astray/feed/ 0
opera day on the beach evokes a climate crisis | WGN 720 radio https://star-warz.net/opera-day-on-the-beach-evokes-a-climate-crisis-wgn-720-radio/ https://star-warz.net/opera-day-on-the-beach-evokes-a-climate-crisis-wgn-720-radio/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 15:36:53 +0000 https://star-warz.net/opera-day-on-the-beach-evokes-a-climate-crisis-wgn-720-radio/ New York (AP) – How do I make my Brooklyn show space a day on the beach? Answer: 21 tons of New Jersey sand are packed in a 50 lb bag, trucked in and dumped on the ground. There are 840 in total. In this way, the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s production team set the […]]]>

New York (AP) – How do I make my Brooklyn show space a day on the beach?

Answer: 21 tons of New Jersey sand are packed in a 50 lb bag, trucked in and dumped on the ground. There are 840 in total.

In this way, the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s production team set the stage for the award-winning opera “Sun and Sea,” which premieres in the United States this month.

Created by three Lithuanian artists, the hour-long opera features 13 singers sitting and lying on beach blankets under the scorching sun. They portray the characters identified in the script (sung here in English) with common titles such as Wealthy Moms and Holic Workers. Non-singing extras fill the stage, build sandcastles, play cards, walk dogs, or just walk.

“It started with the image of the beach from above, and people gathered there,” said Rugili Balzjikaite, who spoke from Lithuania via Zoom. “You can see that they are very fragile because they are half naked… they are very fragile, like the cosmic bodies of the Earth. And the beaches are getting warmer year after year. Together. It’s like that. “

When they chose global warming as their theme, the question was how to explore it through characters barely aware of the problem.

“Climate change is a very large and anonymous topic, so I was wondering how I could write about it,” screenwriter Viva Greinite said. “Therefore, for these characters and singers, it’s like a cloud of thoughts, an inner monologue about something very mediocre and simple.”

But ugly allusions to impending ruin creep in.

Example cited by Grainyté: A woman complains about a messy dog ​​on the beach, but also talks about how she found three edible mushrooms out of season in December. “This little paradox kind of gives us a hint of obstacles in nature. The emotions of tragedy and apocalypse are very present, but they are subtle and not direct.

“There is no such thing as ‘what the hell the world is about to end’,” she added.

Lina Laperite, who composed the music, said:

“So the music is also very light,” she said. “It’s not heavy and it’s quite poppy. Sometimes it might remind you of a pop song you know, but it’s not really one of the songs you know. The accompaniment is a recorded phonetics. Provided by the character synthesizer.

The opera premiered in Lithuania in 2017, was invited to the Venice Biennale in 2019, won the Golden Lion and gave the country’s best presentation.

“Environmental messages are rarely communicated in a subtle, humorous and clear way in works of art,” praised critic Igor Toronyi-lalic in British magazine The Spectator.

Similar to Venice, the BAM production in an intimate fishman space will feature spectators (limited to 100 at a time) overlooking the beach from balconies that surround the stage on all sides. The cast rehearse the show five times a day, and the audience is free to come and go.

“A lot of future audiences are already familiar with the subject,” Laperite said. “What people want to get rid of is the feeling of oneness that we are all together in this area.”

Following the Brooklyn run, the show will move to Philadelphia, Bentonville, Arkansas and Los Angeles from September 15-26.

The singers move according to the production, but each room has its own sand. BAM acquired 21 tonnes from the southern Jersey community, where erosion has pushed the beach five miles inland. This is enough to cover a 57 x 46 foot scene with about 2 inches. Once the race is over, the sand is sucked up and removed by a company who recycles it to construction sites and other uses.


Source link

]]>
https://star-warz.net/opera-day-on-the-beach-evokes-a-climate-crisis-wgn-720-radio/feed/ 0
Opera’s board of directors goes ahead with expansion project https://star-warz.net/operas-board-of-directors-goes-ahead-with-expansion-project/ https://star-warz.net/operas-board-of-directors-goes-ahead-with-expansion-project/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 19:18:59 +0000 https://star-warz.net/operas-board-of-directors-goes-ahead-with-expansion-project/ At their July 8 meeting, the CL Hoover Opera Board of Directors received the feasibility study for adding the property located at 131 West 7th to the Opera House complex. The study was prepared and submitted by architect Bruce McMillan. They announced that the Council voted unanimously to go ahead with the project This proposed […]]]>

At their July 8 meeting, the CL Hoover Opera Board of Directors received the feasibility study for adding the property located at 131 West 7th to the Opera House complex. The study was prepared and submitted by architect Bruce McMillan. They announced that the Council voted unanimously to go ahead with the project

This proposed expansion offers many benefits to customers and the community. The additional space will allow the expansion of the Opera’s extracurricular educational program. Two new rehearsal areas would be created. The additional space will be used to make the Opera Academy of Fine Arts a reality.

Street offices for the Junction City Little Theater and the Junction City Arts Council are included as part of this project. A dedicated studio space would be created for art classes. The addition of this property would also make it possible to reconfigure the existing spaces of the Opera, by creating boxes much closer to the stage, a larger catering kitchen and a “green room” for artists waiting to go on stage. .

At their meeting on September 9, the Opera’s board of directors voted to purchase the building at 131 W. 7th from Sheila Burdette and signed a contract to this effect. The feasibility study estimates the cost of the renovation to be approximately $ 1.75 million. Although this is done in cooperation with the town of Junction City, the opera house board is not seeking taxpayer money for the project.

Anyone who has questions or needs information to support this project should contact Director Joe Markley at CL Hoover Opera House at 785.238.3906.


Source link

]]>
https://star-warz.net/operas-board-of-directors-goes-ahead-with-expansion-project/feed/ 0
Struggling with a painful story – and adding some glam https://star-warz.net/struggling-with-a-painful-story-and-adding-some-glam/ https://star-warz.net/struggling-with-a-painful-story-and-adding-some-glam/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 19:32:18 +0000 https://star-warz.net/struggling-with-a-painful-story-and-adding-some-glam/ “Our task was to tackle the layered history of space,” Garza said, “and because it was such an underutilized space, to revitalize it as an asset to the community.” The house was in a sorry state when the gay advocacy group BIPOC arrived. Decades ago, the city organized tours of historic homes here. Since then, […]]]>

“Our task was to tackle the layered history of space,” Garza said, “and because it was such an underutilized space, to revitalize it as an asset to the community.”

The house was in a sorry state when the gay advocacy group BIPOC arrived. Decades ago, the city organized tours of historic homes here. Since then, it has largely fallen into disuse.

“I swept the dead skin cells from Esek Hopkins in a shovel,” Garza joked.

Their residency culminates this month with outdoor performances of their original dance opera, “The Historical Fantasy of Esek Hopkins”.

Haus of Glitter dance company co-directors (left to right) Anthony Andrade, Matt Garza, Steven Choummalaithong, Trent Lee and Assitan Coulibaly.MARK STOCKWELL FOR THE BOSTON GLOBE

Until this century, Hopkins had, in many ways, been portrayed as a local hero. A Providence college bears his name. A statue in his honor, erected in 1891, stands at the intersection of Branch Avenue and Charles Street.

Yet the Continental Congress fired him from his post in the navy for disobeying orders. Worse, in the mid-1760s, Hopkins commanded the slave ship Sally, commanded by the Brown brothers. Research on Sally’s trip was at the heart of the 2006 Brown University study Slavery and Justice Report, who assessed the school’s dependence on the slave trade.

Of the 196 West Africans that the Sally embarked on, 109 perished before the end of the voyage. Hopkins and his crew called off a rebellion, murdering eight captives and injuring others. Among the others, “Some drowned, some starved and some sick and dyed,” Hopkins wrote in his journal, which Brown published. in line.

“Those who jumped off the ship may have been trying to get back to shore, or just turn to the water,” Andrade said, “that was their way of regaining freedom after months of captivity.”

“The Historical Fantasy of Esek Hopkins” wonders what life would be like if slavery never happened, taking the story of a captive Sally and imagining its full scope and legacy. The people at Haus of Glitter see her as a hero.

The dance opera takes a direct look at the trauma that Hopkins, and the system he worked for, inflicted on enslaved people. Ultimately, it’s also a celebration of resilience and mythical imagination.

“It’s a story of mermaids, history, lineage and resistance,” Garza said. “He goes around the world. It’s a dance party.

They frame the performance as a community healing ritual.

From left to right: Alexx Temena, Trent Lee, Assitan Coulibaly, April Brown, Jess Brown (standing) and Simony Rendesde in Haus of Glitter Dance Company's "The historical fantasy of Esek Hopkins."
From left to right: Alexx Temena, Trent Lee, Assitan Coulibaly, April Brown, Jess Brown (standing) and Simony Rendesde in “The Historical Fantasy of Esek Hopkins” by Haus of Glitter Dance Company.STEPHANIE ALVAREZ-EWENS

“We want all the young people in town to see the story of a character they know by name,” Garza said. “We want it to be empowering for black and brown kids to see, for gay kids to see, for young women to see. “

Haus of Glitter members also planted a community garden, held yoga and meditation classes, and performed cleansing rituals in the house. They instituted “residences”, inviting other black and brown artists to come and rest. Rest is part of the ethic they have established by living in the house.

“We lead with the intention of taking care of ourselves and taking care of each other,” Coulibaly said. “And that, basically, is not a practice that we have inherited as individuals from BIPOC.”

Taking care of themselves and others extends to taking care of their community. The artists accomplished a lot during their residency, according to Micah Salkind, head of special projects for the city’s Art, Culture + Tourism department.

“The amount of work the collective has done is unprecedented in terms of the depth and density of the public programs and the thinking they have devoted to the legacy of this complicated character,” said Salkind.

The group is hoping to address the placement of the Hopkins statue and work to clear his name from the college – a move the Providence school board voted for, but it has yet to happen.

“The institutional work of modifying a memorial really touches the deep inner workings of systems design,” Garza said. “Historic preservation is an industry that benefits from maintaining symbols of white supremacy.”

The artists of Haus of Glitter do not erase the story of Esek Hopkins. They extend it.

“We like to say that we are the most historic new thing that has happened in this house. And none of us murdered anyone, ”Garza said. “As far as we’re concerned, we eclipse the legacy of Esek Hopkins with flying colors. “

THE HISTORICAL FANTASY OF ESEK HOPKINS

Presented by the Haus of Glitter Dance Company at Esek Hopkins House, 97 Admiral St., Providence, September 9-17. Tickets start at $ 15. www.hausofglitter.org


Cate McQuaid can be contacted at catemcquaid@gmail.com. Follow her on Twitter @cmcq.



Source link

]]>
https://star-warz.net/struggling-with-a-painful-story-and-adding-some-glam/feed/ 0
Programming and recommendations for the 2021 Philadelphia Fringe Festival https://star-warz.net/programming-and-recommendations-for-the-2021-philadelphia-fringe-festival/ https://star-warz.net/programming-and-recommendations-for-the-2021-philadelphia-fringe-festival/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 12:31:28 +0000 https://star-warz.net/programming-and-recommendations-for-the-2021-philadelphia-fringe-festival/ The Philly theater community is in desperate need of performing and their excitement for the Philadelphia Fringe Festival is palpable. Over 1,000 performances are scheduled for 170 shows in more than 70 locations across the region from September 9 to October 3. New this year is a festival within the festival – the Cannonball Festival, […]]]>

The Philly theater community is in desperate need of performing and their excitement for the Philadelphia Fringe Festival is palpable. Over 1,000 performances are scheduled for 170 shows in more than 70 locations across the region from September 9 to October 3.

New this year is a festival within the festival – the Cannonball Festival, with dozens of performances at the Maas Building near Fifth Street and Avenue Girard. And within Cannonball is Visions, a festival of short plays held every week.

Many Fringe shows are held outdoors, 40% combine digital and live performances, and 23% are online only. Most producers require proof of vaccination and masks for indoor performances and recommend masks for outdoor spaces, but check with the sites for their specific protocols before you go.

The sheer choice of entertainment is overwhelming, so we asked local theater professionals to comment on their choices.

Appearing at the Fringe Festival at The choice, a comedic and uninhibited inFLUX work that follows three women as they race against their body clocks trying to decide whether or not to have children. ($ 20. September 9-18, Christ Church Neighborhood House, 20 N. American St.)

Choice of fringes:

  • Sun & Sea. I have dreamed of seeing this opera installation by an all-female creative team – Rugilė Barzdžiukaitė, Vaiva Grainytė and Lina Lapelytė – ever since I heard about her debut at the Venice Biennale 2019 (she won the Golden Lion .) Do not miss . ($ 15, September 30-October 3, Budd Building, 2831 Fox Street. Tickets are timed, the opera takes place in one hour.)

  • In buried ground by Shayla-Vie Jenkins and Emily Bate. Recently, I have been grappling with coming to terms with my own mortality, and I can’t wait to see this show. Every time I see Shayla-Vie Jenkins dance, my mind is blown away by the power, precision and freedom of her movement. (Free, September 8 and 11, Christ Church Cemetery, 5th and Arch Street.)

  • Be with by the Nichole Canuso Dance Company. I had the absolute pleasure of participating in Being / With: Home in last year’s Fringe, and I’m more than happy to hear that Nichole is presenting a new iteration. He takes you on a wonderful meditative journey with a complete stranger – connecting you through virtual space and movement. It is enlightening, liberating and joyful. ($ 35. Sep 9-Oct 2, multiple locations)

Thomas also directs films (Jokes – Anger Management, My suicide note (revised), Fire) and is a musician (listen mswproductions.com/music).

Choice of fringes:

  • Baldwin and Buckley in Cambridge, organized by the elevator repair service. James Baldwin’s comment on the social division between us as a people rings true even today. Baldwin and Buckley in Cambridge, which explores the conversations he had during and after his much-publicized debate in Cambridge, will help shed more light and resolution. ($ 39. September 9-11, FringeArts. 140 N. Christopher Columbus Blvd.)

  • Nanay, an interactive dance performance by Ani / MalayaWorks Dance. Every time I see Ani Gavino perform I am fortunate enough to have an experience, not just a show. She takes her audience to a realm where time does not matter. You will be forever changed once you let her talent come into your life. ($ 20, Sept. 17-19, outside at Bartram’s Garden Community Boathouse, 5400 Lindbergh Blvd., bring chairs.)

  • Alice. You can always trust EgoPo to take your mind down the rabbit hole. So now that they’re doing their own reinterpretation of the classic tale, it should turn out to be an event that will make you question your entire perception of the world. ($ 32. September 29 and 30, outside at Glen Foerd, 5001 Grant Ave.)

  • Honorable mentions: No diggity (improvisation from Crossroads Comedy Theater, September 26 at Theater Exile, $ 10), Stellar / Ascent (a dance film by Kyle Marshall Choreography and live performance by Bree Breeden, Kyle Marshall, Jose Lapaz-Rodriguez and Ariana Speight, September 24-25, FringeArts, $ 35), Visualz soundscape (a musical performance by Teyquil Skelton, Warehouse on Watts, $ 10), and I know it was blood: the totally true adventures of a modern black woman (A performance by Tara Lake on storytelling, drama, song and poetry, September 20-22 at Whole Shebang, $ 10.)

West will be performing at the Fringe Festival in $ 7 Girl, an autobiographical solo production based on their experiences as queer and trans sex workers. ($ 20, Sep 19-25, Meuse building, 1325 N. Randolph St.)

Choice of West’s Fringe:

  • I’m especially excited about some of Cannonball’s immersive pieces: If we win by Yannick Trapman-O’Brien, Artefacts of no consequence by Jeff Evans, and Bridal blitz by Gabrielle Revlock. Yannick and I started working together in 2019 and I was fascinated by the way he takes you into the micro-worlds he builds. Evans’ work will be site specific in a chalet and I can’t wait to see how he uses the space. The way Gabby questions the socio-political aspects of dating and relationships is truly fascinating. (If we win, free; Artefacts of no consequence, $ 20; Bridal blitz, $ 20, check cannonballfestival.org for dates and times.)

  • I was so captivated by Irina Varina when I first saw her in Jillian Jetton’s Heat wave. She puts on a show, Irina learns guitar and songwriting, as a public responsibility project. I feel like this is going to be such a beautifully vulnerable room! ($ 15. September 17-October 1, Headlong Studios yard, 1170 S. Broad St.)

  • Connor Hogan does Gilligan gives concerts again, which is a cabaret-quiz about radical self-acceptance. Knowing Connor, this show is sure to be daring, hilarious and full of surprises. ($ 18. September 9 to 24. Victoria Freehouse, 10 S. Front St.)

Kaleidoscope will be back on stage this winter with a production of Amen corner by James Baldwin, possibly at the historic Lawyer Church. Hall-Karambé is also Managing Director of Arden Blair Companies.

Choice of fringes:

  • Enjoy your lunch! By Julia Child and Lee Hoiby (During a pandemic!). Honey, you have it all here – Julia (-esque), food, opera and comedy! I saw Mrs. Child growing up in the Texas countryside. So I’ll bring the wine. It should be fun. (Pay what you can, live broadcast September 6-26.)

  • Adjust the procedure by Jake Shore, produced by Spin Cycle. My reasons here are purely personal. Experiencing firsthand the fallout from the coronavirus in higher education and the lingering consequences, it will be interesting to see how this moment is captured as collective memory. ($ 10 online, for streaming throughout the festival.)

  • Three sisters, adapted by Hank Curry. I’m a fan of Anton Tchekhov and a good adaptation of a classic. I’m interested to see how much (or even if it is) stays true to the ideals of the playwright while exploring the same themes in this modern take. ($ 25, September 9 to 12. Rosenbach museum, 2008 Place Delancey.)

  • Baldwin and Buckley in Cambridge, organized by the elevator repair service. Given the racial and political climate in which we find ourselves, this piece is in demand and needed. This debate took place 55 years ago, but the essence of the question has yet to be answered. ($ 39, September 9-11. FringeArts, 140 N. Christopher Columbus Blvd.)

  • Twelfth night, by Indecorous Theater Productions. I happen to love Shakespeare, and Twelfth Night is one of my favorites. Don’t let the “noble” language fool you; Shakespeare is brewing the earth and spelling tea in this romantic adventure with a false identity and disguise. ($ 20, Sept. 11-26 Strawberry Mansion House, Fairmount Park)

  • In love and mad by Forgotten Lore Theater with Lone Brick Theater Company, Widener University. Reason: It’s Shakespeare. It is the fairy. It’s interactive. Members of the public can really step into the bard with this one. ($ 20, Sept. 16, 17, 18, 19. Outside, the public is guided through Taylor Arboretum, 10 Ridley Drive, Wallingford)

Eissler will lead EgoPo’s Fringe offering, Alice: not your child’s wonderland, an adaptation of Lewis Carroll Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland which he co-wrote with Jenna Kuerzi. The dangerous and upside down wonderland that emerges is a realm for adults, not children. ($ 32, September 29 and 30, outside at Glen Foerd, 5001 Grant Ave.)

Choice of fringes:

  • 707 Dangerous movements. I have been a fan of New Paradise Laboratories for years. 707 it sounds crazy and meta, and what a joy it will be to see [artistic director] Strand [MacLaughlin] perform! “($ 35, Sept. 16-18, Fringe arts, 140 N. boul. Christopher Colombus)

  • deprogram. I love Fringe because so many dance and dance pieces get the attention they deserve. And I love Megan Mazarick and her work, so of course I’ll be there. ($ 15. Sep 29-Oct 1 Maas Building)

  • Sun & Sea. It sounds like such an amazing experience. Opera art installation with no beginning or end on an indoor beach? I had to do a double take. ($ 15, September 30-October 3, Budd Building, 2831 Fox Street. Tickets are timed, the opera takes place in one hour.)

Muroya is a founding member of Asian artists from Philadelphia and has the lead role in the world premiere of R. Eric Thomas’ The eternal present, presented by Theater Exile in five different parks in South Philadelphia from September 11-19. (Free, bring your own chair, date and location details to theatreexile.org.)

Choice of fringes:

  • QvK, presented by Philadelphia Artists’ Collective: Shakespeare’s Best Speeches, Scenic Violence, Audience Voting in One Place? Only 45 minutes? Directed by Damon Bonetti? Composed by the Eli Lynn? Yes please! This piece of PAC hits all the mark for me, and I look forward to it. (Free, September 16 to October 3, outside at Bardascino Park, 1000 S. 10th St., bring chairs.)

  • Change my major to Joan, presented by Boris Dansberry. Boris is a promising and promising queer artist in this city, and I can’t wait to see their solo show! Using contemporary theatrical performances of Joan of Arc, they explore community, representation and queer history, all woven together into a beautiful and touching performance in revue style. (Pay what you can, September 17-19, Pig Iron Theater Company Studio B, 1417 N. 2d St.)

  • Tthe chances of love, presented by the Hum’n’Bards theater company. The Decemberists are one of my absolute favorite bands, and I’m so excited to see their concept album, The vagaries of love, realized in performance! But be warned – this piece is about solid material and is aimed at audience members 21 and older. ($ 10, September 29-October 1. Diving in Front Street, 10 N. Front St., and streaming from October 2.)


Source link

]]>
https://star-warz.net/programming-and-recommendations-for-the-2021-philadelphia-fringe-festival/feed/ 0
ORFEO ED EURIDICE / ZANETTO, Arcole Exterior https://star-warz.net/orfeo-ed-euridice-zanetto-arcole-exterior/ https://star-warz.net/orfeo-ed-euridice-zanetto-arcole-exterior/#respond Mon, 06 Sep 2021 10:34:52 +0000 https://star-warz.net/orfeo-ed-euridice-zanetto-arcole-exterior/ Orfeo succumbs to the temptation and turns to kiss his wife, Euridice, and so the gods demand their price for his failure to keep his end of the bargain, as she dies and he despairs. Christoph Willibald Gluck‘s Orfeo and Euridice is a familiar story, but it gained in intensity during the Covid era as […]]]>

BWW review: ORFEO ED EURIDICE / ZANETTO, Arcola OutsideOrfeo succumbs to the temptation and turns to kiss his wife, Euridice, and so the gods demand their price for his failure to keep his end of the bargain, as she dies and he despairs.

Christoph Willibald Gluck‘s Orfeo and Euridice is a familiar story, but it gained in intensity during the Covid era as people around the world have to keep their distance from loved ones under the threat of the wayward virus. Unlike Orfeo’s visual ban, it’s the hugging that the virus forbids, but the pain of distance is the same, the pain of supposed rejection (especially for some older people) misunderstood, and the stakes just as high. .

Lysanne van Overbeek’s Barefoot Opera returns to Grimeborn after a two-year hiatus to embrace the two-handed boutique opera festival aesthetic. Grafted wooden crates are strewn across the stage, there is a bit of traffic noise escaping from north London and our lovers have a hipster touch from Dalston. Emma Roberts gets to do much of the heavy lifting as Orfeo and sings beautifully, his mezzo-soprano echoing through a somewhat ruthless acoustic space. Lizzie holmes, like Euridice, has less to do, but her soprano cut the heavy early evening tune as her tragic fate caught up with her. Thanks also to Katie Blackwell, who stepped in at short notice to give Amore a menacing, lurking presence, ready to demand the full penalty for any breach of the deal.

Grimeborn’s restrictions have always worked very well in the main Arcola theater, a tight space that lends itself to a common intensity that seeps back and forth through the fourth wall. With spaced seats and a canvas roof, the Arcola Outside tent area too easily dissipates dramatic tensions, forcing singers to act “bigger” (for lack of a better word), adding movement and lighting. to compensate for the unique circumstances of Covid Times. It may be unfair to demand such a leaching of lyrical conventions into styles of musical theater, but the impact of closeness that thrills so much when opera is sung up close and in a personal way is a rare and fragile commodity. and requires ongoing support to work to your full potential.

All this was born in the second opera on the double bill, Pietro mascagni‘s Zanetto, in which Holmes returns in a slanted evening gown as the amorous courtesan, Silvia and Roberts make this “sexy woman who vampires her as a man” schtick in the pants role as the eponymous Zanetto.

Now the intensity is set at 11 from the start, as Silvia describes her materially successful but empty life, a toy for a string of lovers who see her as an object rather than a round person with emotional and spiritual needs. . When she sees the young Chancellor, Zanetto, she is immediately struck by the sensation that he is the man who will fulfill his destiny – literally, the man of her dreams. Ironically, he’s on his way to Florence to see if he can find favor with the famous Silvia, but she never reveals his true identity, knowing that he would be doomed to the same easy life at court if she did.

It breaks your heart to see the tragedy Holmes brings to Silvia’s dilemma, especially offset by the occasional, albeit unintentional, rejections of her cautious invitations. The music (keyboards and bass under the musical direction of Lesley Anne Sammons) tells the story as much as the song, because non-lovers surround themselves without ever breaking the chasm that lies between them. Not for the first time in an opera, you fight the urge to leap forward to intervene and put them on the road to happiness.

It’s important to accept Grimeborn’s self-imposed limitations and embrace the opportunities that come with them. This double bill sees this balance tilting in both directions, but never fails to present the unique qualities of the festival’s philosophy with commitment and technical precision. As with live opera, music and song transcend space and time and amaze us in front of The Miracles forged by voices and instruments that enter and leave our senses.

Orfeo ed Euridice / Zanetto is at Arcola Outside until September 8th.

Photo Peter Moule


Source link

]]>
https://star-warz.net/orfeo-ed-euridice-zanetto-arcole-exterior/feed/ 0
Archer Season 12 Premiere Review – “Identity Crisis” and “Lowjacked” https://star-warz.net/archer-season-12-premiere-review-identity-crisis-and-lowjacked/ https://star-warz.net/archer-season-12-premiere-review-identity-crisis-and-lowjacked/#respond Wed, 25 Aug 2021 14:04:08 +0000 https://star-warz.net/archer-season-12-premiere-review-identity-crisis-and-lowjacked/

Archer Season 12 premieres Wednesday, August 25 at 10 p.m. ET / PT on FXX and is available the next day on FX on Hulu.

In Archer’s Season 12 premiere, “Identity Crisis,” a pair of over-cheerful marketers inform the main cast of dysfunctional spies that they are dinosaurs who must reinvent themselves. It’s a nice meta jab, considering the series has lasted so long largely in constant transformation, spending seasons jumping between genres. But like their perpetually opposing characters, the show’s writers reject that message and instead offer a fantastic start to a season that goes back to the show’s roots.

Archer began as a sort of merger between James Bond and The Office taking place at the International Secret Intelligence Service or ISIS. When the rise of the Islamic State made the name of the fictitious spy agency have a very different impact, the series began to turn things around, transporting its characters to riffs on Miami Vice and Sunset Boulevard before d. ‘go even further for a series of seasons set in the comatose spirit of the series’ namesake super-spy, Sterling Archer (H. Jon Benjamin).

The 25 Best Adult Cartoon TV Shows

While these antics, through pulp and space opera, provided a new way to let actors effectively explore other characters while still retaining key elements of their chaotic dynamics, they felt like diversions from the l main story. Season 11 finally saw Sterling wake up from a coma and turn the life his family and colleagues had built without him upside down, culminating in a fantastic finale where he proved that, despite all his flaws, he was worth keeping. by saving the world a tech bro plans to take advantage of the flood of the world.

Yet the shine of that moment of glory has already faded by the time the “identity crisis” begins. Cloudbeam’s marketing team, Alton (Harvey Guillén from What We Do in the Shadows) and Kaya (Natacha Rothwell from Insecure) say they could have given Archer the adulation he deserves, but instead , the US government covered up the incident and his agency can barely keep the lights on. Cloudbeam blames stiff competition from new spy conglomerate International Intelligence Agency, but as usual, Archer’s inept colleagues are at least equally to blame. No one has called them with a job since psychotic assistant Cheryl / Carol Tunt (Judy Greer) broke the phone and hasn’t told anyone about it.

Archer’s crew are normally totally unfriendly, so there’s a lot to be gained from painting them as underdogs. Sterling himself had to learn a bit of humility after coming out of his coma with less force. No longer the world’s greatest spy, he’s had to rely more on his co-workers, especially his hyper-competent ex-girlfriend Lana Kane (Aisha Tyler), who is perpetually infuriated by Archer’s antics. Of course, given the mercenary nature of the Archer crew, she and fellow spy Ray Gillette (series creator Adam Reed) quickly start talking about how they can join The IIA on their own. IIA chief Fabian Kingsworth (Kayvan Novak of What We Do In The Shadows) is indeed Sterling in his prime, relentlessly mocking the gentleman spy he once admired and providing a perfect foil not just for Sterling. , but to the whole crew.

“Identity Crisis” sees the team trying to beat The IIA for the award for rescuing a kidnapped scientist while “Lowjacked,” part two of the two-part premiere, follows a team-building exercise gone awry thanks to some eco-terrorists who are just as inept as Archer’s crew. The two set the awkward momentum for Season 12, where some of the crew try to be responsible and earn the money and prestige to keep their business going, while others slack off. It’s the kind of prank that has always worked well for the show, which is motivated as much by sexual innuendos (or “phrasing” as Archer calls it) and ridiculous subplots involving cloning and country music, as everything that happens in the main plot.

Going back to the basics of modern espionage allowed Archer to ditch gadgets, as fun as they could have been, and reconnect with what has always made the series great – its crisp writing and incredibly talented voice. . Benjamin perpetually shines as he laughs at his relative luck and the misfortune of his most hated colleague, bureaucrat Cyril Figgis (Chris Parnell) who gets beat up while Archer plays with dogs in “Lowjacked”. Cheryl and HR Director turned Field Agent Pam Poovey (Amber Nash) are constantly embroiled in misadventures, whether it’s developing their own marketing strategy or not being on a mission so they can take advantage of the opportunity. ‘hibachi. When a nervous chef tries to remind them that there’s always a hostage crisis downstairs, Cheryl’s main concern, naturally, is whether that will affect the grill.

Season 12 also marks Jessica Walter’s final role, as the actress who played Malory Archer, Sterling’s overly sexual alcoholic mother and boss, died in March. It’s a worthy cornerstone of her exceptional career as she plays the human manifestation of the lateral eye, perpetually judging her employees between sips of any drink she can get her hands on. The show’s limited animation style does a great job conveying facial expressions and, in particular, it masterfully shows the bewildered disregard Walter previously brought to the role of Lucile Bluth of Arrested Development.

It is a cornerstone worthy of Jessica Walter’s exceptional career.


Malory has always kept his misfit employees together, and Walter’s death calls into question the entire future of the series. But in this final eight-episode season with the full original cast, Archer’s fundamentals are stronger than ever. If this ends up being the show’s final season, it’s especially fitting that it feels so much like a throwback to where it started.


Source link

]]>
https://star-warz.net/archer-season-12-premiere-review-identity-crisis-and-lowjacked/feed/ 0
Massive mythology and sci-fi action in JACIN AND THE OLYMPIANS https://star-warz.net/massive-mythology-and-sci-fi-action-in-jacin-and-the-olympians/ https://star-warz.net/massive-mythology-and-sci-fi-action-in-jacin-and-the-olympians/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 17:34:49 +0000 https://star-warz.net/massive-mythology-and-sci-fi-action-in-jacin-and-the-olympians/ From writer Shayne Berryhill (Chance Fortune and the Outlaws) and artist Mattia Monaco, and co-created by Alex Ogle and colorist Maja Opac, is a user-friendly Kickstarter graphic novel for all audiences of massive proportions. Jacin and the Olympians is an immensely ambitious and entertaining read with tons of lore and infectious energy. With exceptional visuals […]]]>

From writer Shayne Berryhill (Chance Fortune and the Outlaws) and artist Mattia Monaco, and co-created by Alex Ogle and colorist Maja Opac, is a user-friendly Kickstarter graphic novel for all audiences of massive proportions. Jacin and the Olympians is an immensely ambitious and entertaining read with tons of lore and infectious energy. With exceptional visuals and an intriguing setup, Jacin and the Olympians will be the Kickstarter to move back before its release.

“In the near future, the titans of myth return, revealing the dark alien truth behind their legend. The remains of humanity escape aboard the Olympia, a space arch. Now teenage prodigy Jacin Mukai and his fellow Olympians are looking for a way to activate the Colossi robot, in the hopes of uniting them to create their only hope of survival against the threat of the titans – the giant protective robot, Talos.

* Reviewer’s Note *

I received a draft of Jacin of the author. While this is a solid representation of what the graphic novel will be, it is not a finished product. I intend to rate this book based on what I have seen and give my opinion on its current quality and the entertaining side of the finished product.

Writing and plot

What Shayne Berryhill and Alex Ogle have created here looks like a mix of a YA novel and Toonami-era anime. Jacin and the Olympians The opening sequence is exhilarating and provides a familiar yet engaging introduction to the world and the issues. The fusion of Greek mythology and science fiction / space opera is a delicious new experience. Jacin herself is a great young protagonist. Berryhill takes many tropes of gifted kids and throws them into a blender to create the mad genius of a teenage hero.

The Percy Jackson meets Star wars meets Voltron sentiment emanates from all aspects of the writing of this book. This creates some problems. First, there is a tremendous amount of lore and story that the reader is simply immersed in. Second, each segment of the book was separated by an unspecified time jump that introduced new characters and concepts without an introduction. Again, I received an unfinished preview version. It could easily be a problem that I never see. Either way, the unique mix of mediums and styles makes it a delightful read on the storytelling side.

Artistic direction

The most obvious draw at first glance on Jacin and the Olympians is the amazing work of art. Mattia Monaco and Maja Opac create an incredibly detailed and energetic visual experience. Monaco pencils are reminiscent of those of James Stokoe or Daniel Warren Johnson. There is an obvious manga / anime influence in his work. This is particularly evident in his character and his environmental designs. Each surface is loaded with cross hatching, giving it that worn-out future aesthetic of the 80s. That’s not to say that Monaco’s work is purely manga-inspired. On the contrary, it is a perfect fusion of Eastern influences and Western artistic direction.

Monaco character designs are finely drawn love letters with named influences from this comic while remaining unique to this story. The massive mix of mythological visuals and space opera is carefully linked by the artistic vision. Monaco merges geometric patterns from the 80s with indescribably foreign elements. Her characters are expressive and all uniquely drawn, making them instantly recognizable in a crowded panel.

While much of the preview I received has yet to be colored, there was enough work completed that I can honestly say that Maja Opac’s work here is just as spectacular. It matches the aesthetic language of Monaco using a dark color palette of vaporwave styles. There are dark pinks and purples on almost every panel, punctuated with darkness. This creates the almost inevitable feeling of claustrophobia when living on a spaceship. This is however interrupted by the brightness provided by the characters. Jacin herself is a sort of unspoken beacon of hope and progress. It lights up each panel in which it is located. It might be a completely accidental effect, but it’s a delightful detail nonetheless. This graphic novel has an infectious visual energy that is worth the price of admission on its own.

Verdict

Jacin and the Olympians is a unique and immensely enjoyable graphic novel. Shayne Berryhill and Alex Ogle have created a story that everyone can enjoy. This comic takes concepts from mythology and timeless space operas, wraps them in a Saturday morning cartoon and manga, and succeeds in spades. The visuals of Mattia Monaco and Maja Opac are full of thoughtful details and a booming energy. This is a Kickstarter worth supporting, so make a commitment by September 12 to reserve a copy!


Source link

]]>
https://star-warz.net/massive-mythology-and-sci-fi-action-in-jacin-and-the-olympians/feed/ 0